2016 Professional Development Courses

Professional Development Courses at ITherm/ECTC 2016
(lunch and notes are included)

We invite you to come to Las Vegas a day early, for your choice of 18 Short Courses on Tuesday, May 27, 2016. Review the titles and world-class instructors below; for topics of interest; click the link to get a full description, or download details on all 18 courses. Then register for ITherm and your choices. If you’re already registered, please add on these classes at low attendee rates.

We especially call your attention to three courses covering the thermal field:
6. INTEGRATED THERMAL PACKAGING AND RELIABILITY OF POWER ELECTRONICS,
taught by Profs. Patrick McCluskey and Avram Bar-Cohen (University of Maryland);
9. THERMO-ELECTRIC COOLERS: CHARACTERIZATION, RELIABILITY, AND MODELING,
taught by Jaime Sanchez (Intel Corporation),
and
18. THERMO-ELECTRICAL CO-DESIGN OF 3D CHIP STACKS,
taught by Ankur Srivastava and Avram Bar-Cohen (University of Maryland).
You may obtain Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for these courses.

MORNING COURSES (8:00 AM – Noon):1. ACHIEVING HIGH RELIABILITY OF LEAD-FREE SOLDER JOINTS – MATERIALS CONSIDERATIONS. Course Leader: Ning-Cheng Lee – Indium Corporation 2. WAFER LEVEL CHIP SCALE PACKAGING. Course Leader: Luu Nguyen – Texas Instruments

3. LED PACKAGING, SYSTEM, AND RELIABILITY CONSIDERATIONS. Course Leader: Xuejun Fan – Lamar University

4. SYSTEM SCALING FOR NEW ERA OF SELF-DRIVING, INFOTAINING AND ELECTRIC CARS. Course Leaders: Rao Tummala and Venky Sundaram – Georgia Institute of Technology

5. POLYMERS AND NANO-COMPOSITES FOR ELECTRONIC AND PHOTONIC PACKAGING. Course Leaders: C. P. Wong – Georgia Institute of Technology; Daniel Lu – Henkel Corporation

6. INTEGRATED THERMAL PACKAGING AND RELIABILITY OF POWER ELECTRONICS. Course Leaders: Patrick McCluskey and Avram Bar-Cohen – University of Maryland … full details

7. FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRICAL DESIGN AND FABRICATION PROCESSES OF INTERPOSERS, INCLUDING THEIR RDLs. Course Leaders: Ivan Ndip and Michael Töpper – Fraunhofer IZM

8. INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS BASED QUALITY AND RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY. Course Leaders: Shubhada Sahasrabudhe and Sandeep Sane – Intel Corporation

9. THERMO-ELECTRIC COOLERS: CHARACTERIZATION, RELIABILITY, AND MODELING. Course Leader: Jaime Sanchez – Intel Corporation … full details

 

AFTERNOON COURSES (1:15 PM – 5:15PM):10. FLIP CHIP FABRICATION AND INTERCONNECTION. Course Leaders: Eric Perfecto – GlobalFoundries; Shengmin Wen – Synaptics Inc.11. FAN-OUT WAFER LEVEL PACKAGING. Course Leader: Beth Keser – Qualcomm Technologies, Inc.

12. OPERATION, DESIGN, CHARACTERISTICS, AND KEY PARAMETERS OF INTEGRATED SILICON ANALOG COMPONENTS. Course Leader: Badih El-Kareh – Consultant

13. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MEMORY SYSTEMS. Course Leader: Wendem Beyene – Rambus

14. POLYMERS FOR ELECTRONIC PACKAGING. Course Leader: Jeffrey Gotro – InnoCentrix, LLC

15. NOVEL INTERCONNECT AND SYSTEM INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGIES. Course Leader: Muhannad Bakir – Georgia Institute of Technology

16. PACKAGE FAILURE MECHANISMS, RELIABILITY, AND SOLUTIONS. Course Leader: Darvin Edwards – Edwards Enterprises

17. 3D IC INTEGRATION AND 3D IC PACKAGING. Course Leader: John Lau – ASM Pacific Technology Ltd.

18. THERMO-ELECTRICAL CO-DESIGN OF 3D CHIP STACKS. Course Leaders: Ankur Srivastava and Avram Bar-Cohen – University of Maryland … full details

Details on Thermal Courses:


6. INTEGRATED THERMAL PACKAGING AND RELIABILITY OF POWER ELECTRONICS. Course Leaders: Patrick McCluskey and Avram Bar-Cohen – University of Maryland
Course Objectives:
Power electronics are becoming ubiquitous in engineered systems as they replace traditional ways to control the generation, distribution, and use of energy. They are used in products as diverse as home appliances, cell phone towers, aircraft, wind turbines, radar systems, smart grids, and data centers. This widespread incorporation has resulted in significant improvements in efficiency over previous technologies, but it also has made it essential that the reliability of power electronics be characterized and enhanced. Recently, increased power levels, made possible by new compound semiconductor materials, combined with increased packaging density have led to higher heat densities in power electronic systems, especially inside the switching module, making thermal management more critical to performance and reliability of power electronics. Following a quick review of heat transfer principles and thermal management techniques, along with prognostic health management approaches to assess and ensure reliability, this short course will present the latest developments in the materials (e.g. organic, flexible), packaging, assembly, and thermal management of power electronic modules, MEMS and systems, along with modeling and testing techniques. This course will emphasize thermal packaging techniques capable of addressing performance limits and reliability concerns associated with increased power levels and power density in power electronic components.
Course Outline:
— Introduction to Integrated Thermal Packaging for Reliable Power Electronic Systems
— Simulation and Assessment of Active Thermal Management Techniques
— Application of Thermal Management Techniques to Commercial Power Systems/Data Centers
— Durability Assessment: Failure Modeling, Simulation, Testing, and Health Monitoring
— Reliability and Thermal Packaging of Active Devices (Si, SiC, GaN) and Interconnects
— Reliability and Thermal Packaging of Switching Modules, Including Encapsulants
— Reliability in Assembly Packaging: Rigid PCBs, Solders, Passives, OLED, Flex Circuits
— MEMS and Sensor Packaging
Who Should Attend:
This course is intended for new and established engineers and technical managers in the field of electronic packaging who would like to learn more about the mechanical and thermal issues involved in reliably packaging devices and circuits for applications involving high voltage, current, and power loss.


9. THERMO-ELECTRIC COOLERS: CHARACTERIZATION, RELIABILITY, AND MODELING. Course Leader: Jaime Sanchez – Intel Corporation
Course Objectives:
Thermo-electric coolers are devices widely used in the semiconductor industry as the main thermal engines for thermal control during test of integrated circuit devices. They offer the ability to both heat and cool a device under test to mimic worst case platform conditions and defect screening at different temperatures. In this short course, we will review fundamental characterization techniques of thermoelectric coolers that allow the direct measurement of relevant properties such as the effective Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, and thermal impedance. A detailed numerical modeling approach will be discussed that utilizes user-defined functions in Fluent that allows a close representation of these devices matching experimental conditions. Experimentation and numerical analysis techniques will be discussed that enable the full characterization of a thermal solution based on thermoelectric coolers both in steady and transient state. A comprehensive overview of modeling and experimentation techniques will be provided that capture the dynamic behavior of a thermal solution connected to a closed loop control algorithm: the impact of various approaches of controlling the junction temperature of a device under test under different conditions, as well as the sensitivity of the dynamic response of the full system including the effect of active power management of the device under test. Finally, experimental techniques based on reliability statistics will be covered that have a direct application into predicting the life of a thermo-electric cooler under various test conditions.
Course Outline:
1. Introduction
— State-Of-The-Art in Thermo-Electricity
— Research What is Thermo-Electricity
— General Industrial Applications
2. TEC Modules Governing Principles
— Single Peltier Couple to a TEC Module
— Governing Equations and Relationships
— Example of TEC Module Selection Based on a Static Cooling Application
3. TEC Module Characterization and Modeling
— Experimental Setups and Methodology
— Overview of Analytical Approaches
— Overview of Transient Characterization
4. Operation of TEC Modules in Dynamic Closed Loop Control
— Applications to Test ICs
5. Reliability of TECs
— Overview of Failure Modes
— Improvements for Test Application
6. Summary and Future Directions
7. References
Who Should Attend:
This course is intended for students and engineers in the electronics cooling industry specifically, but should be of interest for those working with thermo-electric modules in general. The class will cover experimental and numerical methods.


18. THERMO-ELECTRICAL CO-DESIGN OF 3D CHIP STACKS. Course Leaders: Ankur Srivastava and Avram Bar-Cohen – University of Maryland

Course Objectives:
3D integration provides significant improvements in device density, interconnect delays, system integration, and computational efficiency but is expected to lead to higher heat densities, along with decreased thermal management access to individual chips and on-chip hotspots. To achieve the inherent computational advantages of 3D integration it will, thus, be necessary to unify the thermal and electrical design of 3D chip stacks and explore new thermal management paradigms for such packaging form factors. This PDC will begin with a brief review of chip packaging, placing 3D chip stacks in the context of packaging history and identifying the form factors and heat dissipation loads expected in homogeneous and heterogeneous 3D integration. Attention will then turn to thermal-electrical “co-design,” unifying the circuit layout with the thermal and fluidic aspects of the design to create an integrated co-design environment that enables designers to estimate the impact of the cooling solutions on the electrical aspects and vice versa. Recognizing the growing popularity of FPGAs, especially those which exploit 3D integration, the discussion shall pay attention to the nuances of FPGA design, as well as the more-traditional ASICs. It will be shown that relying on conventional “remote cooling” techniques for 3D integration could have catastrophic consequences, necessitating use of embedded cooling solutions, including integrated micro-fluidics, to achieve the performance goals. The PDC will close with several co-design case studies which demonstrate the potential impact of such a design activity on the performance and energy efficiency of 3D ICs
Course Outline:
— Thermal Packaging History and Trends
— Thermal Management Requirements for Chips, Chip Stacks, and MMICs
— Gen-3 Embedded Cooling Options: Microfluidics, Conductive Substrates, Thermal Interconnects, Thermoelectric Coolers
— Electronic Design Automation
— Thermo-Electrical Co-Design Case Studies
— 3D Unified Micro-fluidic Thermal Interconnect Networks
— Gate Level Optimizations Unlocked by Co-Design
— 3D CPU Architectures Enabled by Co-design: Impact on Performance and Energy Efficiency
— Microfluidic Cooling and Reconfigurable Platforms: FPGAs
— Future Challenges and Opportunities
Who Should Attend:
IC package design engineers and managers that are looking to learn about the electrical performance design challenges and techniques as well as those packaging SI/PI engineers wanting to refresh their conceptual understanding of the fundamentals and the challenges posed by process limitations should attend this class.


Continuing Education Units
The IEEE Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology Society (CPMT) has been authorized to offer Continuing Education Units (CEUs) by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET) for all Professional Development Courses that will be presented at the 64th ECTC.
CEUs are recognized by employers for continuing professional development as a formal measure of participation and attendance in “non-credit” self-study courses, tutorials, symposia and workshops. Complete details, including voluntary enrollment forms, will be available at the conference. All costs associated with ECTC Professional Development Courses CEUs will be underwritten by the conference, i.e. there are no additional costs for Professional Development Courses attendees to obtain CEU credit.